Webinar Review: Spanish legal translation – a comparison of two different legal systems

Yesterday I attended a webinar entitled “Spanish legal translation – a comparison of two different legal systems” (eCPD webinars: https://www.ecpdwebinars.co.uk), presented by Sofia Brough-Aparicio, a Spanish translator who specialises in the legal field. What caught my attention was that the webinar dealt with my specific language pair and a field in which I work a lot, both as a translator and as an interpreter. Continue reading “Webinar Review: Spanish legal translation – a comparison of two different legal systems”

Can translators help save the Earth?

A report on Michael Cronin’s thought-provoking ideas on the role of translators in environmental sustainability.

Have you ever considered how translation may be contributing to climate change? How translation workflows exploit natural and human resources? Or how translators may be able to help humankind understand and interact with the natural environment? These were some of the questions that Professor Michael Cronin explored in his keynote presentation at the 2017 FIT Congress, entitled “Why Translation Should Not Cost the Earth – Towards Geocentric Translation Studies”. Continue reading “Can translators help save the Earth?”

How understanding language as disruption and conciliation can help you translate more effectively

A summary of Dr John Jamieson’s presentation at the 2017 FIT Congress: “Single to Turku, please” – or Translation as the Art of Managing Disruption.

A long-term and fondly regarded figure on the New Zealand translation scene, Dr John Jamieson is known for his unique insights into the nitty gritty of translating. He gave us a brief outline of his theories and approach in his presentation at the 2017 FIT Congress, entitled “Single to Turku, please” – or Translation as the Art of Managing Disruption. Continue reading “How understanding language as disruption and conciliation can help you translate more effectively”

Co-translating a Chinese Novel: An Attempt at Meaningful Cultural Dialogue

Literary translation is a unique form of translation, and practitioners need to think creatively as they struggle first to decode the source text, and then to convey it in a style that meets the very demanding standards of a reader of fiction.

In a recent co-translation project of a 21st-century Chinese-language novel featuring almost exclusively ethnic Uyghur characters, the close collaboration of two bilingual translators – native English speaker Bruce Humes and myself, a native Chinese speaker – enabled our rendition to touch upon the essence of Uyghur culture and present it in English through meaningful dialogue. Continue reading “Co-translating a Chinese Novel: An Attempt at Meaningful Cultural Dialogue”

The Language Assistance Project – what is it, and how might it affect you?

At the 2017 NZSTI National Conference held in Auckland in mid-June, Quintin Ridgeway gave a presentation on the Language Assistance Project. While Quintin is known to us as the National President of our own organisation, he in fact wears a number of hats, and he was asked to give this presentation in his capacity as Manager of the Internal Affairs Translation Service and Co-convener of the Language Sector Reference Group. Continue reading “The Language Assistance Project – what is it, and how might it affect you?”

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